Awards Database

Awards Database

A key goal of the Agnese Nelms Haury Program in Environment and Social Justice is to forge stronger relationships between expertise and resources within Southwestern communities and those at the University of Arizona (UA) and encourage outstanding scholarship at the nexus of environment and social justice.

The Awards Database shared here offers a comprehensive record of awards the Haury Program has made to advance those collaborations and to recognize outstanding UA faculty and visiting associates.

Suggested Keywords: Seed Grant, Challenge Grant, Faculty Fellow, Visiting Associate, YWCA, UA, Sociology

Hermanas Building Confidence, Readiness, Empowerment, Action, Transformation, and Employment for Women

Lead: Andrade, Rosi (UA Southwest Institute for Research on Women)
Partners: UA Southwest Institute for Research on Women, Siter Jose Women's Center

  • Award Date: Jan 2018
  • Award Amount: $102,550
  • Type: Seed
  • Duration: 2 years
View Abstract

The Hermanas Building Confidence, Readiness, Empowerment, Action, Transformation and Employment for Women ("Hermanas CREATE') project promotes social inclusion and well-being of chronically homeless women through an established partnership between Sister Jose Women's Center (SJWC) and the University of Arizona's Southwest Institute for Research on Women (UA-SIROW). SJWC tends to the care and nurture of homeless women in a welcoming and safe environment, where women receive direct services (e.g., food, clothing, a shower, shelter) to meet basic survival needs, and take respite from the challenges of homelessness and extreme poverty. Hermanas CREATE is a novel program of social justice that provides an income source for women as they begin the intense personal work of charting their path to a sustainable life through active participation. Hermanas CREATE also provides an opportunity for cohorts of women to work together to remove obstacles to entitled benefits, experience personal growth and build self-confidence, practice wellness and make healthy choices, all in a trusted and familiar environment that seeks to empower rather than extend dependence. Their work seeks to: (1) Increase understanding of needs and strengths of chronically homeless women in Tucson, Arizona, through a yearly community needs assessment. (2) Inform about the complexity of the experiences, and needs and strengths of women by developing a gender-informed White Paper that will provide a community-wide resource; and (3) Implement Hermanas CREATE to expand SJWC services and programming as a forum for social justice.

Increasing Equity and Efficacy in Local Fruit Harvesting and Education

Lead: Ravia, Jennifer (UA Department of Nutrition Science)
Partners: UA Department of Nutrition Science, Iskashitaa Refugee Network

  • Award Date: Jan 2018
  • Award Amount: $39,964
  • Type: Seed
  • Duration: 2 years
View Abstract

This project aims to increase food security and enhance food justice for resettled refugees in Tucson and is being implemented through collaboration between the UA Department of Nutritional Science (NSC), Iskashitaa Refugee Network (IRN), community and homeowners associations, refugees, volunteers, and UA Students. The purpose is to work towards greater harvesting efficiency and sustainability, increase community harvests, maximize partnerships and local involvement. The main goals are: 1) Improve environmental justice in Tucson through pro-active neighborhood involvement and a systematic outreach program, 2) Improve social justice for refugees in Tucson through participation in IRN activities, 3) Improve organizational project planning, monitoring and evaluations (PME) capacity or IRN staff/interns/volunteers.   

Red Feather DIY Healthy Heating

Lead: Seidenberg, Joe (Red Feather Development Group)
Partners: Red Feather Development Group, UA Department of Sociology, NAU Department of Anthropology

  • Award Date: Jan 2018
  • Award Amount: $37,862
  • Type: Seed
  • Duration: 1 year
View Abstract

The goal of this project is to reduce exposures to hazardous indoor air pollution from improperly burning wood and coal for heating on the Hopi reservation through the development and implementation of a DIY Healthy Heating class. There are numerous educational materials designed to teach people how to change behavior for health, but experience shows that relationships and engagement are key to successful long-term impacts on home health with people living on tribal lands. The project is focused on 1) Research on sources of alternative fuels, where Hopi people can obtain these fuels and how, and the feasibility of adopting these new alternatives, 2) Develop the DIY course and accompanying materials and deliver it, 3) Pilot test and evaluate the DIY course with a small sample of Hopi community members and evaluate the pilot data, and 4) Implement a dissemination plan including the development of PSAs.

Visiting Associate

Lead: Perkins, Tracy (Howard University)
Partners: Howard University, UA Department of Geography and Development, UA Department of Sociology

  • Award Date: Jan 2018
  • Award Amount: $20,000
  • Type: Visiting Fellow
  • Duration: 4 months
View Abstract

The visiting associate, Tracy Perkins of Howard University, will spend four months in the Southwest working with Tracy Osborne and Brian Mayer of the University of Arizona. Perkins is creating a digital archive of a 1990s era campaign against a nuclear waste landfill to make them available to a broad audience. The project highlights the role of five tribes along the lower Colorado River in the landfill’s eventual defeat. 

"Farmacy" Project

Lead: Sparks, Elizabeth (TVF)
Partners: Tucson Village Farm, UA College of Medicine, El Rio Clinics

  • Award Date: Jul 2017
  • Award Amount: $50,420
  • Type: Seed
  • Duration: 2 years
View Abstract

Tucson Village Farm, a program of UA College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and Pima County Cooperative Extension, is an education-based farm that reconnects youth to a healthy food system, teachers them how to grow and prepare fresh food, and empowers them to make healthy life choices. Working with UA College of Medicine and El Rio Health Clinics, TVF is beginning a new program,”Farmacy,” TVF works with at-risk families to engage them in farm-to-table, hands-on nutrition education and culinary programming. This collaboration provides  families with the opportunity to significantly reduce their risk and their children’s risk of developing nutrition-based diseases by incorporating healthy foods into their diets.

Faculty Fellow

Lead: McMahan, Ben (CLIMAS)
Partners: None Listed

  • Award Date: Jul 2017
  • Award Amount: $76,000
  • Type: Faculty Fellow
  • Duration: 2 years
View Abstract

Faculty fellow McMahan, assistant research scientist with the Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS), expands his work at CLIMAS to build a portfolio of projects operating at the intersection of his interest in climate/environmental risks (climate, pollution, and land usechange), community based participatory methods including citizen science/monitoring and participatory mapping, to engage with communities on their environmental concerns, and to use web/data visualizations to communicate results within and outside community networks. These projects allow him to use/teach data visualization techniques (to community members, participating students, science classes in the ARAN community network), and to demonstrate compelling ways that we can communicate environmental impacts and scientific findings while building community collaborations and a research team of students.

Faculty Fellow

Lead: Williams, Jill (WISE)
Partners: None Listed

  • Award Date: Jul 2017
  • Award Amount: $76,000
  • Type: Faculty Fellow
  • Duration: 2 years
View Abstract

Faculty fellow Williams, director of Women in Science and Engineering (WISE), directs her fellowship to a collaboration with Sara Tolbert from the UA College of Education to implement an action-research project aimed at better understanding the relationship between politicized environmental science education (e.g., pedagogical approaches grounded in attention to issues of inequality and social justice) and science identity, motivation, and self-efficacy among students from groups traditionally under-represented in the sciences.

Hot Spots for Heat Resilience in Border Cities: A pilot Study in El Paso, TX

Lead: Garfin, Gregg (Institute of the Environment)
Partners: A.Y.U.D.A, INC., Red de Promotoras Paso del Norte , SERI

  • Award Date: Jul 2017
  • Award Amount: $53,517
  • Type: Seed
  • Duration: 2 years
View Abstract

This project aims to increase resilience to the public health risks of dangerous extreme heat episodes in the U.S.-Mexico border region. The team focuses resilience efforts and resources on marginalized residents in underserved colonias of San Elizario, TX, and among expectant mothers. Colonias are characterized by a lack of public services and basic infrastructure, such as potable water. The team focuses on extreme heat environmental justice, because: residents of colonias and expectant mothers are particularly vulnerable to extreme heat, risks are amplified by \ substandard housing and infrastructure, and heat risks are projected to increase. The collaboration will co-develop, implement, and evaluate a certified heat-health risk-training program and neighborhood network building strategy; develop and evaluate low-cost interventions to reduce negative heat-health impacts to residents and expectant mothers; and organize a prototype border-wide learning network, to improve heat-health preparedness. The team will produce bilingual training curricula, educational materials, project reports and evaluation— communicated to stakeholders and partners. These efforts will promote increased capacity to address heat-health risks, cross-fertilization of ideas between partners and among prospective learning network communities—to strengthen the capacities of populations at risk to heat waves, and improved understanding of heat-health risks and risk communication leading to more sustained and longer-term impacts including improved public understanding of risks, and reduced vulnerabilities to heat waves.

Preparing the Next Generation of Native American and Hispanic STEM Innovators

Lead: Lopez, Gerardo U (UA College of Agriculture & Life Sciences)
Partners: San Xavier District Tohono O'odam, Pascua Yaqui Nation, TUSD, SUSD, San Xavier Mission School, Indigenous Strategies, PCC, Modern Reflections

  • Award Date: Jul 2017
  • Award Amount: $599,971
  • Type: Challenge
  • Duration: 3 years
View Abstract

The overall vision of STEM RISE Arizona (Renewing Initiative & Sustaining Environment) is to endow students with a culturally relevant, project-based learning experience through which they gain a relevant understanding of math and science concepts to break math barriers which can prevent educational and economical opportunities. Developing the necessary math skills opens the door to advance math courses by 12th grade. These opportunities and skills will increase the number of underserved youth placing into higher prerequisite math courses required in STEM fields including environmental majors at Pima Community College and the University of Arizona, reduce the number of underserved youth testing into remedial math, and to inspire underserved Native American and Hispanic youth to pursue STEM studies and careers including those in environmental fields.

Sustainable South Tucson: Seeking New Models for Economic Development in and with Marginalized Communities

Lead: Flores, Marisol (Executive Director, Microbusiness and Advanced center YWCA Southern Arizona)
Partners: YWCA, James E. Rogers School of Law

  • Award Date: Jul 2017
  • Award Amount: $99,788
  • Type: Seed
  • Duration: 2 years
View Abstract

This 2-year project will introduce YWCA, UA and community leaders to alternative development models, including the principles used by BRAC International, the world’s largest non-governmental organization (NGO), in order to pilot a strategy that has the potential for community wealth building, environmental sustainability and greater resilience for the people of South Tucson and beyond. the evidence shows that conventional development models fail the Southwest Doughnut test. New models are needed. BRAC International, ranked the #1 NGO in the world in 2016, is working on multiple continents in communities very similar to South Tucson to reduce poverty and improve livelihoods, break the cycle of poverty, and empower marginalized and vulnerable people. But BRAC has yet to penetrate the North American continent. This project will bring BRAC’s entrepreneurial experience and knowledge to bear on our region’s most pressing challenge.

Engaging low-income, underserved communities in a neighborhood greenway: A community-university partnership for project design, implementation and evaluation

Lead: Gerlak, Andrea (UA Geography & Development)
Partners: Sonoran Institute, Watershed Management Group

  • Award Date: Jan 2017
  • Award Amount: $79,153
  • Type: Seed
  • Duration: 2 years
View Abstract

This project works with community groups and non-profits to improve equity and justice issues around green infrastructure and urban connectivity along the Liberty Bike Boulevard, 4.85-mile route of existing residential bike routes on Tucson’s southside. The work focuses on harnessing community interest, non-profit study and action, and city activity through community-university partnership. Year one of the project focused on developing the project activities and dialogues to begin to shape the community engagement process with particular emphasis on the partner network. The team will focus on engagement at the neighborhood level in year two.

Engaging Native Boys in Education, Tribal Lifeways, and Land Stewardship: An Exploration

Lead: Wyman, Leisy (UA College of Education)
Partners: Eric Dhruv (Ironwood Tree Experience), Melodie Lopez (Indigenous Strategies)

  • Award Date: Jan 2017
  • Award Amount: $49,309
  • Type: Seed
  • Duration: 2 years
View Abstract

Lack of male participation in education and tribal lifeways related to land-use practices and management is a key environmental and social justice issue in Indian Country today. Youth engagement in these areas is also necessary for building sustainable Native nations. Very little research discusses the social justice issue of Native boys’ engagement, even among educational initiatives targeting boys and young men of color. Few social justice programs targeting boys and men of color, in turn, speak to land-use issues and environmental justice. This project  investigates and documents Native boys’, young men and leaders’ perspectives on Native youth engagement and environmental justice issues, creates resources highlighting promising programs and educational approaches for engaging Native boys and young men in educational pathways and environmental justice issues related to tribal land use and management, fosters intercultural and intergenerational discussion of Native boys’ and young men’s perspectives on engagement, education, and environmental issues and possibilities, creates an intertribal and intercultural network of youth, tribal leaders and educators focused on social justice and environmental collaboration, knowledge-sharing and problem-solving and plans related educational program changes in the College of Education at UA, the Native Educational Alliance, and the Ironwood Tree Experience while identify new collaborative program and action research opportunities to increase Native youth engagement in education and tribal lifeways related to the environment.

Faculty Fellow

Lead: Karanikola, Vasiliki (UA College of Engineering)
Partners: None Listed

  • Award Date: Jan 2017
  • Award Amount: $76,000
  • Type: Faculty Fellow
  • Duration: 2 years
View Abstract

Faculty fellow Vasiliki Karanikola, research scientist with the University of Arizona’s Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, works with marginalized communities on the Navajo Nation lands to improve access to clean water. Installation of water purification systems which use alternative energy sources, such as solar, treat water sources with impaired quality. This work also provides opportunities for growth by creating business models for vulnerable communities reliant on improved water, food and energy circumstances. Karanikola also serves as faculty advisor to Engineers Without Border – University of Arizona Chapter which provides engineering consulting services to the Nalwoodi Denzhone Community, a non-profit organization of the San Carlos Apache Reservation in southeastern Arizona. Karanikola is spending the 2017-18 academic term at Yale University to perfect analytical skills critical to her work and to her department.

Faculty Fellow

Lead: Wilder, Ben (UA College of Science)
Partners: None Listed

  • Award Date: Jan 2017
  • Award Amount: $76,000
  • Type: Faculty Fellow
  • Duration: 2 years
View Abstract

Faculty fellow Wilder, research scientist with the Institute of the Environment, is interim director of Tumamoc Hill, a facility of the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona.  His fellowship provides support for Wilder to renew the vision of outreach and research at Tumamoc Hill as well as to expand his biological research in South America.

Their Dogs Came with Them: Environmental Justice, Social Justice and Theater

Lead: Grise, Virginia (playwright)
Partners: Arts, Environment and Humanities Network (AEHN)

  • Award Date: Jan 2017
  • Award Amount: $2,500
  • Type: Visiting Fellow
  • Duration: 2 weeks
View Abstract

Virginia Grise is a playwright who visited the Tucson area to collaborate with the University of Arizona English Department and Borderlands Theater to workshop the script of Their Dogs Came with Them, an adaptation of Helena Maria Viramontes’ 2007 novel about four young Mexican American women in east Los Angeles during the 1960s and the hardships, challenges and successes of dealing with colonist abuses. Ms. Grise’s visit and workshoping allowed local community members to participate and inform the work through incorporation of their experiences into the lives of the characters. The visit included two workshops, public readings and development of collaborations. One outcome of the visits it that Ms. Grise and UA professors are imagining a more comprehensive program to address environmental and social justice challenges in prison through storytelling and theater. Ms. Grise builds on and sustains the work of this visit through her development of The Convivial Arts Practice Institute.