Awards Database

Awards Database

A key goal of the Agnese Nelms Haury Program in Environment and Social Justice is to forge stronger relationships between expertise and resources within Southwestern communities and those at the University of Arizona (UA) and encourage outstanding scholarship at the nexus of environment and social justice.

The Awards Database shared here offers a comprehensive record of awards the Haury Program has made to advance those collaborations and to recognize outstanding UA faculty and visiting associates.

Suggested Keywords: Seed Grant, Challenge Grant, Faculty Fellow, Visiting Associate, YWCA, UA, Sociology

Graduate Student Support

Lead: Megdal, Sharon, UArizona Water Resources Research Center
Partners:

  • Award Date: Sep 2020
  • Award Amount: $18,000
  • Type: Tribal Initiative - Water Sustainability
  • Duration: 1 year
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

Graduate Student Support for Sharon Megdal, UArizona Water Resources Research Center

Recipient: Miguel Moreno, UArizona Law Student

Mr. Moreno will assist Dr. Megdal with planning for  “Indigenous Water Dialogues”, and the program for the “202X Indigenous Water Issue Conference”

Leupp well predesign

Lead: Tulley-Cordova, Dr. Crystal, and Jason John, Navajo Nation Department of Water Resources
Partners: Milton Bluehouse Jr., Deputy Chief of Staff, Office of the President and Vice President

  • Award Date: Sep 2020
  • Award Amount: $200,000
  • Type: Tribal Initiative - Water Sustainability
  • Duration:
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

Pre-design is desperately needed to evaluate and connect Leupp Well 2B to the new well located in Leupp, AZ in the southwestern region of the Navajo Nation planned to supply water for the Dilkon Medical Center, currently under construction. The primary well constructed for the Dilkon Medical Center has water quality issues, and additional water source is needed. The Southwestern Navajo Rural Water Supply Program Appraisal Study has been completed by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Native American Affairs Office for the southwestern region of the Navajo Nation, including Leupp in the southwestern portion of the U.S.  Leupp Well 2B is 1096 feet deep and yielded 745 gallons per minute.  Leupp and the immediate surrounding area receives the least amount of precipitation compared to the rest of the Navajo Nation; it is the aridest area and is susceptible to severe drought conditions. Pre-design costs are $551,314.

Native American Web Portal Research Database and Inventory of Programs

Lead: Williams, Robert A. Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program (IPLP) The UArizona College of Law
Partners:

  • Award Date: Sep 2020
  • Award Amount: $15,000
  • Type: Tribal Iniative
  • Duration: 8 months
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

Funding support to complete the design and then launch the UArizona Native American Web Portal Research Data Base and Inventory of Resources and Programs (“Grand Challenges” pillar- identified in the overall 2019 Strategic Plan for the University of Arizona).

Pascua Yaqui Tribe-UArizona Micro Campus

Lead: Williams, Robert A. Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program (IPLP) The UArizona College of Law
Partners:

  • Award Date: Sep 2020
  • Award Amount: $20,000
  • Type: Tribal Initiative - Education Pipeline
  • Duration: 1.5 years
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

As part of the 2019 University of Arizona Strategic Plan Native American Advancement and Tribal Engagement Initiative (UA Native American SP), the University of Arizona (UA) Provost’s Office and the Pascua Yaqui Tribe have agreed to establish the UA’s first tribal micro campus on the Pascua Yaqui Reservation (Note: this is partial funding).

Support for UArizona College of Law

Lead: Williams, Robert A. Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program (IPLP) The UArizona College of Law
Partners:

  • Award Date: Sep 2020
  • Award Amount: $22,000
  • Type: Tribal Iniative
  • Duration: 1.5 years
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

Funds for an Administrative Assistant to the newly appointed United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, (UNSRRIP/Special Rapporteur), Francisco Cali Tzay. 

 

Navajo COVID-19 Water Needs Mapping

Lead: Chief, Karletta, UArizona Department of Soil, Water and Environmental Science
Partners: Northern Arizona University, Ronson Engineering, University of California, MSU, University of New Mexico, SRIC

  • Award Date: Aug 2020
  • Award Amount: $47,591
  • Type: Tribal Initiative - Water Sustainability
  • Duration: 6 months
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary
The project aims to identify COVID-19 high-risk areas in the Navajo Nation. Through UArizona’s collaborations regarding water, health, and environmental health, project leaders will create a map that combines water quality, water infrastructure, health, and socio-economic data to identify areas on the Navajo Nation that are most at risk for a COVID-19 spike in the fall due to lack of access to
water, food, and energy. 

Air to Water Technology Demonstration Site in Navajo Nation and Water Bus – Water Treatment in Shipaulovi, Hopi Nation

Lead: Sorensen, Mark, STAR School (Painted Desert Demonstration Projects, Inc)
Partners: Jing Luo, Appex Applied Technology, Inc., Trent Teegerstrom, Arizona Federally Recognized Tribes Extension Program (FRTEP)

  • Award Date: Jul 2020
  • Award Amount: $17,400
  • Type: Tribal Initiative - Water Sustainability
  • Duration: 10 months
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary
The Water Bus project aims to serve as a rapid relief response effort which will provide safe drinking water to the Hopi Tribe villagers. The water bus will be deployed in Shipaulovi Village. The Water Bus's filtration system requires no external power sources as it is 100% solar powered. 
 
The Air to Water project aims to test a system powered by an integral combination of solar photovoltaics and high-efficiency solar thermal energy to produce water. The team will conduct a performance test of the SOURCE Hydro-Panel system to better understand the feasibility of applying “air to water” technologies in arid and semi-arid regions. The system will be deployed in the Navajo Nation. 

Off Grid Water Purification Units in Navajo Nation

Lead: Karanikola, Vasiliki, UArizona College of Engineering
Partners: Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (NTUA), the Indian Health Service (IHS) Sanitation Facilities Construction Program and a Chapter House in the Navajo Nation

  • Award Date: Jul 2020
  • Award Amount: $45,300
  • Type: Tribal Initiative - Water Sustainability
  • Duration: 9 months
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

The project aims to address the urgent need for food, energy, and water on the Navajo Nation that has been intensified due to COVID-19. The project leaders will use pressure-driven desalination methods, nanofiltration (NF), and reverse osmosis (RO) for the treatment of brackish waters such as those on the Navajo Nation while producing high-quality water. The system will be powered by solar panels.  

The team will construct and deploy two off-grid mobile water purification units to test the system. The overall goal of the project is to provide mid and long-term solutions to the food, energy, and water challenges in the Navajo Nation.

Preparing the Next Generation of Native American Hispanic STEM Innovators - Phase 2

Lead: Fortuin, Kevin, Sunnyside Unified School District
Partners:

  • Award Date: Jun 2020
  • Award Amount: $81,570
  • Type: Challenge
  • Duration: 1 year
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

The project's aim is to inspire underserved Native American and Hispanic youth to pursue STEM careers. The project focused on strengthening opportunities related to the nexus of social justice and the environment in the education pipeline (k-12) for underserved Native Americans and Hispanic youth. The project prepared students with the necessary math background for them to take advanced math courses by 12th grade to increase the number of underserved youth placing into higher prerequisite math courses required in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). 

Graduate Student Support

Lead: Chief, Karletta, UArizona Department of Environmental Science
Partners:

  • Award Date: May 2020
  • Award Amount: $18,000
  • Type: Tribal Initiative - Water Sustainability
  • Duration: 8 months
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

Graduate Student Support for Karletta Chief, UArizona Department of Environmental Science.

Recipient: Nikki Tulley, second-year Ph.D. student, UArizona Department of Environmental Science

Ms. Tulley will assist Dr. Chief on the Indigenous Food, Energy & Water Security and Sovereignty (Indige-FEWSS) program. Indige-Fewss aims to develop a diverse workforce with intercultural awareness and Food-Energy-Water Security (FEWS) expertise to address FEWS challenges in indigenous communities.

Preparing the Next Generation of Native American Hispanic STEM Innovators - Phase 2

Lead: Martinez, Carmen, San Xavier District Education Center Tohono O’odham Nation
Partners:

  • Award Date: Mar 2020
  • Award Amount: $84,000
  • Type: Challenge
  • Duration: 1.5 years
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

The project's aim is to inspire underserved Native American and Hispanic youth to pursue STEM careers. The project focused on strengthening opportunities related to the nexus of social justice and the environment in the education pipeline (k-12) for underserved Native Americans and Hispanic youth. The project prepared students with the necessary math background for them to take advanced math courses by 12th grade to increase the number of underserved youth placing into higher prerequisite math courses required in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). 

A Borderlands Observatory: Understanding and Communicating the Effects of Border Enforcement and Policy on Sonoran Desert Communities

Lead: Jeffrey Banister, UArizona The Southwest Center, and Vicki Gaubeca, Southern Border Communities Coalition
Partners: David Seibert, Borderlands Restoration Network; Robin Reineke, UArizona Southwest Center; Natalia Mendoza Rockwell, Fordham University; Carolyn O'Meara, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México; Chris Lukinbeal, UArizona School of Geography and Development

  • Award Date: Jan 2020
  • Award Amount: $5,850
  • Type: Partnering
  • Duration: 1 year
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

Since at least the mid-1990s, United States immigration policies have harshly affected people and places across the Sonoran Desert border region. In an attempt to ‘secure’ the border, these policies have militarized and effectively ‘weaponized’ the desert landscape, using infrastructure and enforcement to funnel migration into the hottest, driest, and most sparsely populated zones. The hoped-for result is that the ruggedness, isolation, and extreme heat would deter migrants from attempting to cross. Instead, the border has become a collective site of humanitarian and ecological crisis.

Social justice and environmental groups in the region have responded with great courage and creativity, but their voices are so often lost in the political fray and drowned out by the stridency of popular media. In particular, they face two central challenges: 1) their work remains largely isolated -- that is, these groups are, with some important exceptions, not in dialogue with one another; and 2) their unique data are rarely available to a broader public, let alone shared among different non-profit groups to increase effective collaboration. This partnership collaboration aims to build a team that works for an ethical and equitable program of collaborative inquiry among academic, humanitarian, and environmental communities. We hope to break down the silos of border research and nurture the production of much-needed local knowledge on the region. Our overarching reason for this partnership, therefore, is to begin developing a framework for collaboration between researchers and community partners to protect, extend, and communicate the innovative local ways that human and non-human communities have resisted, restored, and flourished in the context of border militarization.

The primary project partners (co-leads) -- UA Southwest Center, Southern Border Communities Coalition, and Borderlands Restoration Network -- will work toward a common language and collective goals for sharing data and local knowledge on the impacts of border militarization in the Sonoran Desert region. Such a partnership brings together a diverse array of backgrounds and perspectives: humanistic, environmental, and social.

 

 

Building a Network that Incubates Worker-owned Cooperatives for a Regenerative Society

Lead: Yue "Max" Li, UArizona School of Natural Resources and the Environment, and Raye Winch, Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona
Partners: Shefali Milczarek-Desai, UArizona Law, and The Tucson Cooperative Network [The Community Food Bank of Arizona, Tucson Rainwater Harvesting Co-op, Cooperative Impulso, Flowers and Bullets, BICAS, Local First Arizona, Technicians for Sustainability]

  • Award Date: Jan 2020
  • Award Amount: $5,608
  • Type: Partnering
  • Duration: 1 year
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

This partnership aims to strengthen the Tucson Cooperative Network (TCN). The TCN promotes and supports the creation of worker-owned cooperatives, growing a community with fair wages, equal rights, equity and mutual collaboration. We focus on regenerative businesses such as rainwater harvesting, habitat restoration, sustainable food production, and individual capacity building centered on indigenous values that respect all beings. These businesses regenerate natural, social and cultural capital and build resilience to climate change. We work with all people without discrimination and prioritize immigrants, women, LGBTQ+, people who are low-income, and people of color. By supporting these marginalized populations to become business owners, we restore socioeconomic equality to achieve social justice.

Our network organizations (see Question 3) focus on supporting local/regional communities to achieve environmental sustainability and environmental justice. By developing a viable business model for these activities, we create a more financially sustainable path for these critical activities. We envision the Southwest in the next 25 years prospers from businesses centered on regenerating instead of depleting natural, social and cultural capitals. This region also will support a strong ecosystem of democratically governed cooperative businesses. In this model, market capital flows to the population in need and the environment in need to restore ecological balance, enhance social collaboration, and strengthen democracy and economic equality. We take a network approach, focus on key players in our regional network, train them to become both cooperatives and cooperative promoters. Our approach is analogous to acupuncture, activating and strengthening critical nodal points in a network to achieve whole-system effects. This network approach not just moves the needle, but creates a socioeconomic movement that unites our society and restores natural balance.

Building environmental and climate education equity and action in K-6 education

Lead: Rebecca Lipson, Assistant Director of Education for UA Science: Sky School, within Steward Observatory, and Janna Acevedo, TUSD Magnet School Program
Partners: Kerry Schwartz, Arizona Project WET, and Benjamin Blonder, UArizona Science Coordinator Sky School Steward Observatory

  • Award Date: Jan 2020
  • Award Amount: $79,104
  • Type: Seed
  • Duration: 2 years
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

As communities develop climate response plans to mitigate the hardships a changing climate brings, the gap between the haves and have-nots becomes apparent. This is seen even in Tucson, the third-fastest-warming city in the U.S., where inequity results in significantly less tree shade in the southern parts of the city compared to the north. Developing the next generation of environmental leaders to address these challenges locally requires the inclusion of people from diverse backgrounds. However, many young people do not gain exposure to environmental science and climate change topics, nor do they build connections to their local environments, in part because their teachers are not well versed in these topics.

This project brings together Sky School and Project WET with the Tucson Unified School District. We will recruit two cohorts of twenty 4th and 6th grade teachers in underserved schools for monthly, year-long professional development days on climate science and sustainability, emphasizing local issues. Through connections with the University of Arizona researchers and community leaders, teachers will build knowledge of the science behind climate change and its local impacts. They will be supported by curriculum experts in creating engaging lessons to implement with their students. As a final project, students and teachers will utilize project-based learning to create and carry out an action plan on a sustainability topic they identify as important in their school or community.

This project will develop a cohort of teachers engaged in climate and sustainability, who will influence students at underserved schools for years to come.

Gender Diversity Initiative

Lead: Lisa Bowden, Kore Press Institute, and Deanna Lewis, UArizona Mel & Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health
Partners: Tina Howard, Kore Press Institute; Tanner Menard, Equality Arizona; Lizette Trujillo, Southern Arizona Gender Alliance; Em Bowen, UArizona College of Education; and Molly Burke, UArizona Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine

  • Award Date: Jan 2020
  • Award Amount: $5,000
  • Type: Partnering
  • Duration: 1 year
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

Kore Press Institute and the UArizona College of Public Health seek to develop a cohesive and productive partnership by laying a foundation that addresses the critical aspects of collaborative skill-building and team-building that make a successful project (the Gender Diversity Initiative). We recognize that input from all partners is valuable and necessary, and therefore, we intend to follow a ​community-based, facilitated process with a true cross-sector at the table for deep and rich conversations from multiple perspectives. ​The aim is to change culture, mindsets, resource allocation, systems, and health outcomes for safer, more accessible, and inclusive learning environments in order to move the needle on basic safety in Arizona schools for LGBTQ+ youth.

This partnership intends to address this pressing need for safer, more inclusive educational ecosystems, environments, and practices cognizant of health outcome disparities for LGBTQ+ youth. We intend to move the needle for our most vulnerable by addressing the root cause of gender-based violence with interventions to affect systemic change: teacher education and policy change. We view the issue of safety for our most vulnerable as a moral and environmental imperative. The partnership intends to build a stronger and more richly diverse social ecosystem for a more just and sustainable Southwest in 25 years. Providing an environment of safety and social justice for the most marginalized populations in Southern Arizona’s classrooms has deep implications. We recognize that normative narratives don’t work for everybody and that those who are worried about personal safety are not only barred from accessing an ability, and right, to fully thrive, but also from putting energy into issues facing the larger, natural environment like climate change or food security.

Our goals for funding the partnership include building specific skills and capacities that will support a successful, long-term collaboration and project. We want to build these capacities as co-leaders as a base, and to share bits of knowledge with other partners and collaborators across the project, especially since we will be intentionally working across sectors, across cultures, across generations, often with differently impacted populations, and potentially with folks who may not be allies.