Awards Database

Awards Database

A key goal of the Agnese Nelms Haury Program in Environment and Social Justice is to forge stronger relationships between expertise and resources within Southwestern communities and those at the University of Arizona (UA) and encourage outstanding scholarship at the nexus of environment and social justice.

The Awards Database shared here offers a comprehensive record of awards the Haury Program has made to advance those collaborations and to recognize outstanding UA faculty and visiting associates.

Suggested Keywords: Seed Grant, Challenge Grant, Faculty Fellow, Visiting Associate, YWCA, UA, Sociology

Research Assistant in support of the Native American Code Writers Program

Lead: Dr. Jeremy Garcia and Dr. Blaine Smith, UArizona College of Education
Partners:

  • Award Date: Dec 2021
  • Award Amount: $101,945
  • Type: Tribal Resilience Initiative - Native Pathways
  • Duration: 2 years
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

Award to support the hiring of a Project Coordinator for the Native American Code Writers Program hosted at the UArizona College of Education.

Support for UArizona College of Law, Year 2

Lead: Williams, Robert A. Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program (IPLP) The UArizona College of Law
Partners:

  • Award Date: Dec 2021
  • Award Amount: $15,000
  • Type: Tribal Resilience Initiative
  • Duration: 1 year
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

Year 2 to fund an Administrative Assistant to the newly appointed United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, (UNSRRIP/Special Rapporteur), Francisco Cali Tzay. 

 

Native American Web Portal Research Database and Inventory of Programs, Year 2

Lead: Williams, Robert A. Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program (IPLP) The UArizona College of Law
Partners:

  • Award Date: Oct 2021
  • Award Amount: $10,000
  • Type: Tribal Resilience Initiative
  • Duration: 1 year
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

Funding support to complete the design and then launch the UArizona Native American Web Portal Research Data Base and Inventory of Resources and Programs (“Grand Challenges” pillar- identified in the overall 2019 Strategic Plan for the University of Arizona).

NNDWR Library Preservation Project, Phase 2

Lead: The Library Preservation Project, conceived to preserve and give public access to valued, one-of-a-kind documents, some dated back to the 1930s, involves three phases: Phase I consists of securing over 8,000 water resource documents, reports, and maps fr
Partners: Maurice Upshaw, NNDWR Water Management Branch and Teresa Miguel-Stearns, UArizona Law Library

  • Award Date: Oct 2021
  • Award Amount: $10,408
  • Type: Tribal Resilience Initiative - Water Sustainability in Indian Country
  • Duration: 8 months
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

The Library Preservation Project, conceived to preserve and give public access to valued, one-of-a-kind documents, some dated back to the 1930s, involves three phases:

Phase I consists of securing over 8,000 water resource documents, reports, and maps from NNDWR Library at the Daniel F. Cracchiolo Law Library. For now, the only people who will have access will be researchers that will be pre-approved by NNDWR on a case-by-case basis and facilitated by the Daniel F. Cracchiolo Law Library.

Phase II consists of preparing and digitizing the collection. At this point, Daniel F. Cracchiolo Law Library plans to recruit and hire students to help with Phase II work, including preparing the collection materials for digitization, creating metadata, and performing quality control. Leads secured funding from CERES for phase II.

Phase III is a collaborative effort between the Daniel F. Cracchiolo Law Library and the UArizona’s Communication and Cyber Technologies to create a database to host the digitized library. Once the collection is digitized, most of the collection will be publicly available, with NNDWR determining which resources will require restricted access.

The Library Preservation Project honors the tribal and information sovereignty of the Navajo Nation and their data and resources while working with the NNDWR to provide access to essential information to improve all aspects of water resources in the Navajo Nation

Research Assistant Support for UArizona American Indian Studies Department

Lead: Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert, UArizona American Indian Studies
Partners:

  • Award Date: Sep 2021
  • Award Amount: $18,000
  • Type: Tribal Resilience Initiative
  • Duration: 1 year
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

The award supports the work of Dr. Tsosie-Paddock and will further advance faculty diversity at UArizona and strengthen education and equity for Navajo students. Dr. Tsosie- Paddock has been teaching the university’s only first- and second-year Navajo courses along with numerous Navajo-related courses in AIS.

Exploring the Health and Healing of our Rivers: Engagement Strategy Proposal Concept

Lead: Aleena M. Kawe, President, Redstar International
Partners:

  • Award Date: Jul 2021
  • Award Amount: $17,500
  • Type: Tribal Resilience Initiative
  • Duration: 1 year
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

The award will help Redstar develop and implement a strategy to utilize the film From the Mountains to the Sea to engage a national audience to explore the health and healing of our rivers through an Indigenous lens. This interactive campaign and materials will be developed to build conversations centered on diverse Indigenous worldviews, values and perspectives about the future of our nation’s rivers.

The aims of the engagement strategy will be: a) to highlight the interconnectedness between our health and the health of our rivers, b) to Share the learnings that emerged through Indigenous knowledge exchange, and c) to Explore Indigenous pathways to heal our rivers through sustainable, systemic change.

NAI Staff Support

Lead: Dr. Karen Francis-Begay, Assistant Vice Provost, Native American Initiatives
Partners:

  • Award Date: Jul 2021
  • Award Amount: $27,213
  • Type: Tribal Resilience Initiative
  • Duration: 2 years
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

Funds to support the hiring of a Program Coordinator for the UArizona Native American Initiative office led by VP Dr. Karen Francis-Begay.

Native American Code Writers High School Certificate Program for Southern Arizona Tribes

Lead: Dr. Jeremy Garcia and Dr. Blaine Smith, UArizona College of Education
Partners:

  • Award Date: Jun 2021
  • Award Amount: $76,723
  • Type: Tribal Resilience Initiative - Native Pathways
  • Duration: 1 year
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

Award to support a partnership between the College of Education’s Indigenous Teacher Education Project (ITEP) and the Digital Innovation and Learning Lab (DIALL), led by Drs. Jeremy Garcia, Blaine Smith, and Valerie Shirley to initiate the “Indigenizing Coding Education” project. The project will enable the establishment of relationships with local Native nations and tribal schools, with the goal of co-constructing a digital literacies and Native American Code Writers Program that strives to include Indigenous knowledge, languages, and values of the communities.

Research Assistant Support for UArizona College of Education

Lead: Dr. Jameson D. Lopez, UArizona School of Education
Partners:

  • Award Date: Jun 2021
  • Award Amount: $18,000
  • Type: Tribal Resilience Initiative - Native Pathways
  • Duration: 1 year
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

Funds to support Dr. Jameson D. Lopez from the UArizona School of Education.

Research Assistant Support for UArizona College of Engineering

Lead: Dr. Kevin Lansey, UArizona College of Engineering
Partners:

  • Award Date: Jun 2021
  • Award Amount: $18,000
  • Type: Tribal Resilience Initiative - Native Pathways
  • Duration: 1 year
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

Funds to support Joint Professor Dr. Kevin Lansey from the UArizona School of Civil Engineering and Hydrology and Atmospheric Science to hire Mr. Christian Jimmie from Arizona State University.

Research Assistant Support for UArizona School of Geography, Development and Environment

Lead: Dr. Andrew Curley from the UArizona School of Geography, Development, and Environment
Partners:

  • Award Date: Jun 2021
  • Award Amount: $18,000
  • Type: Tribal Resilience Initiative - Native Pathways
  • Duration: 1 year
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

Funds to support Dr. Andrew Curley from the UArizona School of Geography, Development, and Environment to hire Marle Dave Lister from the University of North Carolina.

Bridge to STEAM

Lead: Kimberly Sierra-Cajas, STEM Learning Center
Partners: Diné College

  • Award Date: May 2021
  • Award Amount: $47,992
  • Type: Tribal Resilience Initiative - Native Pathways
  • Duration: 8 months
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

The award will fund five tribal college students from Diné College to participate in a joint summer research experience between The University of Arizona and Diné College. The program, hosted by the Arizona Institutes for Resilience, is called Bridge to STEAM and immerses students in a 10-week summer research hands-on experience. 

La Siembra: Sowing a New Model of Community Engagement Through Urban Agriculture, Phase 2

Lead: Silvia Valdillez (Flowers and Bullets) and Moses Thompson (UArizona School of Geography and Development)
Partners:

  • Award Date: May 2021
  • Award Amount: $300,000
  • Type: DAF Award
  • Duration: 3 years
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

For the last several years, F&B members have been leading Barrio Centro to greater health and safety by building on the community's strengths and assets. F&B transformed the grounds of Julia Keen Elementary School into an urban farm called the Midtown Farm. The farm serves as a training ground for youth and community members to learn a broad range of skills. Children, youth, parents, and grandparents flock to the school grounds to volunteer, harvest produce, and learn about sustainable living grounded in the practices of the community's ancestors. Participants take workshops on backyard gardening, water harvesting, and raising and processing goats for milk, cheese, and meat. Water harvesting, permaculture, and other green infrastructure systems are not widely accessible to marginalized communities, who also suffer from limited access to healthy food. These sustainable living practices are a way to combat the economic, health, and food struggles in the Barrio – and support people in becoming more economically self-sufficient.

The Midtown Farm offers a new model of community engagement through urban agriculture. The Midtown Farm is a tool to build community and address historical trauma in Barrio Centro. Trauma is caused by disproportionate incarceration, substance use, food insecurity, health disparities, and economic inequality. We build trust and community by responding in real-time to the needs of the community.

The project includes the purchase of the property, deconstruction, and renovation of the building, increases in operating costs for two years, and completion of other site elements, including the building to ramadas, greenhouses, workshop spaces, and storages to reduce the cost of renovating the property, minimize future maintenance cost, and create a structure that can harvest rain, provide shade and enable vibrant activities that strengthen Barrio Centro.

Native SOAR's staff assistantship

Lead: Amanda Cheromiah, Director, Native SOAR
Partners:

  • Award Date: May 2021
  • Award Amount: $18,000
  • Type: Tribal Resilience Initiative - Director's Fund
  • Duration: 3 months
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

The award aims to fund the hiring of two summer staff members to recruit new students and for operational funds for Native SOAR’s first virtual summer program.

Toward a Vision of Community Wellness: Reclaiming Agency, Self-Care, and Connection to Place, Phase 2: Evaluation

Lead: Mabie, Debi Chess (The Dunbar Coalition, Inc.)
Partners: University of Arizona Center for Regional Food Studies, El Rio Health Centers and African American Coalition for Health and Wellness, Inc.

  • Award Date: May 2021
  • Award Amount: $37,500
  • Type: DAF Award
  • Duration: 5 years
  • Status: Ongoing
View Summary

In light of the "twin pandemics" of covid-19 and structural racism/police violence, and the greatest impact being on Black communities in the US, as part of the Dunbar Wellness Project, Dunbar will document the impacts both now as well as into the coming decade of the events that have unfolded in 2020. Dunbar will recruit a cohort of 20 Black/African American Tucsonans of varying ages, genders, and socioeconomic backgrounds to interview them about their health status, experiences of care, strategies for maintaining health and wellness, and how place/space factors into their feelings of healing and belonging. Interviews also include "cartographies of healing" through which individuals engage in a process of “counter-mapping” to render visual representations of important sites of healing, care, and belonging as these have emerged or changed during the pandemic.

In addition to soliciting updates to health status and cartographies of healing each year, Dunbar would also seek to collect life histories, genealogies of displacement and family histories, and illness narratives of cohort members. Narratives collected through these interviews are both key to informing future health and wellness programming at the Dunbar and for understanding the broader health and demographic shifts that are underway in our region.