Tuesdays With Haury Biweekly Newsletter

Newsletter

Welcome!

Welcome to the Agnese Nelms Haury Program in Environment and Social Justice biweekly update, Tuesdays with Haury. This update will help us share our work with the communities we serve. It also will offer our campus and outside colleagues a means to collaborate and provide input. 
 
The Haury Program supports the UArizona land grant mission of extending cutting edge research and policy expertise to communities in our region and beyond that face water sustainability challenges. To advance that goal, the Haury Program seeks to: provide and incentivize financial support for research, education, and outreach; fortify internal UArizona networks; build strong, trust-based external partnerships; be a communication hub for shared work and goals; and develop ties to philanthropic and other entities that share our mission. 

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August 17, 2021  Learn about the new Native American Advancement, Initiatives, and Research web portal. The portal elevates UArizona's long-standing commitment to Native and Indigenous knowledge and engagement. 

May 25, 2021  Meet Mr. Christian Sage Jimmie from ASU and Mr. Majerle Dave Lister from the University of North Carolina, Haury's two new Haury Native Pathway Initiative Awardees collaboration with scholars at the University of Arizona.   

May 11, 2021  Learn about Dr. Jameson D. Lopez, Assistant Professor, UArizona Educational Policy Studies and Practice at the College of Education, one of three successful candidates awarded a Haury Tribal Resilience Initiative Award.   

April 27, 2021 The Haury Program features the work of Dr. Jennifer Jenkins, professor at the UArizona's English Department and the Southwest Center, and principal investigator of the Tribesourcing Southwest Film Project.  

April 13, 2021 The Haury Program celebrates Dr. Marti Lindsey's twenty years of stellar work at UArizona. Dr. Lindsey is the Outreach & Community Engagement Director at the Southwest Health Science Center, SWEHSC.  

March 30, 2021 The Haury Program introduces Trent Teegerstrom, the Associate Director for Tribal Extension Programs and Extension Specialist in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics. Learn more about his work with Indigenous communities in the Southwest and beyond. 

March 16, 2021 The Haury Program celebrates World Water Day with the story of two sisters, Crystal Tulley-Cordova and Nikki Tulley. They lived in their maternal and paternal grandparents' homes in the Navajo Nation and learned the importance of water and water conservation, as the homes did not have running water like many homes in the Navajo Nation. They spent time outdoors, looking at and learning about plants, rocks, and animals, translating to interests in geology, anatomy, and other STEM fields.

March 2, 2021 Haury Program Interim Director Toni Massaro hosted a conversation between U.N. Special Rapporteur José Francisco (Pancho) Cali Tzay and Regents Professor and Arizona Law IPLP faculty co-chair Robert A. Williams. Lisgen to the conversation. 

February 16, 2021 Through its education pipeline, the Haury Program invests in educational programs that deliver project-based learning activities that are culturally relevant to students' backgrounds. One stellar example is the SBAR-Arizona 4-H partnership. The three-pronged partnership is led by Alix Rogstad, Sustainable Bioeconomy for Arid Regions (SBAR) Center for Excellence, Nick Morris, Arizona 4-H STEM, and Kimberly Ogden, College of Engineering.

February 2, 2021 When the U.N. announced on March 16, 2020, that José Francisco (Pancho) Calí Tzay will be the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples for the next three years, the Haury Program saw a unique opportunity to partner with the Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program (IPLP) to strengthen UArizona’s commitment to tribal resilience. Learn more about Mr. Calí Tzay’s work on Indigenous peoples’ human rights  

January 19, 2021 Learn about A Student's Journey, a collaborative effort between the Tohono O'odham Community College and the Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center at the University of Arizona to establish a path to help tribal college students transfer to a 4-year university, and expand the professional workforce within the tribe. This work is funded by the Haury Program through a three-year Challenge Grant award made in 2019 and currently supports one of the Haury Program's main goals of fostering Native American student success.  

January 5, 2021 Our fourth Haury Profiles installment features Kirena Tosie from the University of New Mexico Water Resources Program. Kirena is working with Dr. Tulley-Cordova, principal hydrologist for the Navajo Department of Water Resources (NDRW), on updating the NDRW Water Resource Development Strategy. Learn more about Kirena's work on Navajo Nation.  

December 8, 2020 In response to the water sustainability challenges faced by Indian Country due to COVID-19, the Haury Program has launched the Tribal Resilience Initiative (TRI). The TRI aims to support the water sustainability goals of the Navajo Nation and Indian Country, in general, and to strengthen the Native American and Indigenous student, faculty, and staff pipeline at UArizona. To honor the work of people working with Native and Indigenous communities, the Haury Program has created the Annual Tribal Resilience Leadership Awards. Learn more about it.  

November 24, 2020 On November 16, Haury Program Interim Director Toni Massaro and SVP for Native American Advancement Nathan Levi Esquerra engaged in a thoughtful conversation as part of our new Conversations With Haury series. SVP Esquerra spoke passionately about the importance of closing the social justice gap faced by Native Americans. In this newsletter, you will find a link to the recording. 

November 10, 2020 Last May, the Haury Program awarded four project proposals developed in partnership between UArizona and tribal leaders to find solutions to the water sustainability challenges faced by the Navajo Nation and Hopi Tribe. The projects respond to long-term water accessibility problems that were escalated by the spread of COVID-19. The projects funded are 1) Air to Water Technology Demonstration Site in Navajo Nation; 2) Water Treatment Bus in Hopi Tribes' Shipaulovi Village; 3) Off-Grid Water Purification Units in Navajo Nation; and 4) Navajo COVID-19 Water Needs Data Mapping. All offer solutions based on the stated goals and needs of the communities served. The newsletter include more detailed information about these projects. 

October 27, 2020 In our fourth installment of Haury Profiles, we had a conversation with Miguel Moreno. Miguel Moreno is a candidate for Juris Doctor at the UArizona James E. Rogers College of Law. He focuses on protecting and promoting Indigenous peoples' rights and is currently interested in tribal water law. Miguel is part of the Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program (IPLP) at the UArizona. Learn more about Miguel's interests and passions. 

October 13, 2020 Our third Haury Profiles installment features SVP for the UArizona Native American Advancement office. Nathan Levi Esquerra grew up in Parker, home of the Colorado River Indian Tribes, one of the 22 federally recognized sovereign Native American tribes in Arizona. He is a member of the Chemehuevi Indian Tribe, based in Havasu Lake, California, 40 miles north of Parker on the Colorado River. Learn more about his proposal to improve Native American student success and promoting tribal interests.

September 29, 2020  In our second installment of Haury Profiles, we discuss Patrisia Gonzales’ work. Patrisia Gonzales is an Associate Professor at the UArizona Mexican American Studies. Professor Gonzales specializes in Indigenous ways of knowing and Indigenous medicine and engages in projects that advocate for Indigenous rights, challenging and expanding the paradigms of Western Science. Learn more about her work.

September 15, 2020  Our newsletter features our first Haury Profiles installment. We had a conversation with Dr. Carrie Nuva Joseph. Dr. Joseph is a member of the Hopi Tribe and her Tribe’s first female Ph.D. scientist, allowing her to advocate for her community using science and Hopi ways of knowing. Dr. Joseph received a 2-year Faculty Fellowship from the Haury Program in 2018. Learn more about Carrie's work. 

September 1, 2020 The newsletter features a translation of the Mohawk version of the Haudenosaunee Thanksgiving Address developed and published in 1993 by the Six Nations Indian Museum and Tracking Project. The address has ancient roots dating back over 1,000 years. Today, people from the Six Nations – Mohawk, Oneida, Cayuga, Onondaga, Seneca, and Tuscarora – use it to open and close all their gatherings. 

August 18, 2020 A special feature about water in Navajo Nation. To Indigenous peoples nature is the source and sustenance of all life. Culture, government, economics, and nature are all intertwined in Indigenous know-how. This deep relationship with nature is even more evident when talking about water. Water is sacred, water is in the center of Indigenous peoples' livelihood and beliefs, Water IS life. 

August 4, 2020 The Agnese Nelms Haury Program invites you to stay connected and learn new tools to communicate through times of crisis. Today more than ever we have a commitment to build an effective cross-cultural communication strategy ensuring our message gets to the right people through the right means. The newsletter includes three webinars we invite you to join.

July 21, 2020 We had a conversation with Nikki Tulley, a second-year Ph.D. student in the Department of Environmental Science with a concentration in Hydroscience at the University of Arizona, and Annie Lascoe, Chief Relationship Officer at DigDeep. Annie and Nikki share their passion for and experience in improving Indigenous communities’ living conditions in the Southwest. Their research helps us better understand the implications of water accessibility in food sovereignty, energy dependency, and health in the Navajo Nation.  

July 7, 2020 In this newsletter, you will find current and past examples of Haury-supported paths to trust-based partnerships. Partnering brings new perspectives and helps us identify and bridge gaps in our assumptions, expertise, and knowledge. Authentic and respect-based partnerships help balance the power between and among communities, increase trust, and advance social justice.  

June 23, 2020 The Agnese Nelms Haury Program in Environment and Social Justice is committed to principles of justice and to working together to create a more equitable and sustainable future for all. We thus support the national call for needed reform of the American criminal justice system and law enforcement, to assure that all people enjoy full liberty and equality. The arc of history will bend toward justice only if we work together to assure this end. Learn more about it here. 

June 9, 2020 Welcome to the Agnese Nelms Haury Program in Environment and Social Justice weekly update, Tuesdays with Haury. This update will help us share our weekly activities with the communities we serve. It also will offer our campus and outside colleagues a means to collaborate and provide input.