Community Partner Directory

Community Partner Directory

Programs

The Agnese Nelms Haury Program in Environment and Social Justice supports an array of programming to further research, education, and partnerships for socially just solutions to environmental problems. The environmental and social justice issues of the Southwest border region and the world require long-range planning and sustained commitment. The Haury Program began its investments in scholarship and research at the University of Arizona in 2014 and is extending investment through partnerships that reach out to communities. The program portfolio will evolve over time. In Fall 2015 the Haury Program began semi-annual calls for proposals for new programming.

The Agnese Nelms Haury Program in Environment and Social Justice invests in new and ongoing programs that engage students in real-world experience and learning.

Initial investments: During 2015, the Haury Program invested in three successful programs to increase their effectiveness and educational opportunities in social justice and the environment:

  • Support for Undergraduate Leaders in the Associated Students of the University of Arizona (ASUA) Compost Cats,
  • Support for Biosphere 2 Outreach Scholars, and
  • Community and School Garden Program.

​New approach to undergraduate funding: In fiscal year 2017, the Haury Program took a new approach and invested in three existing programs as undergraduate funding pilot projects: 

The University of Arizona Green Fund  is a unique approach to campus sustainability. Through its Annual Grant and Mini Grant programs, the Green Fund supports sustainability-related projects proposed by any member of the UA community, and encourages collaborations between students, faculty, and staff. In FY17, the Agnese Nelms Haury Program in Environment and Social Justice provides additional funding via the usual Annual Grant and Mini Grant funding process for projects that provide socially just solutions to environmental problems. Notably, all grants are awarded by a committee of ten graduate and undergraduate students, which means the decisions behind this student-funded program are made by students.

The University of Arizona Office of Student Engagement, 100% Engagement offers grants to student engagement projects. As with the Greeen Fund, the Haury Program provides funding under the existing framework to projects with a social justice and environmental component. The Haury Program funding especially encourages student engagement in projects and programs in the larger off-campus community, such as internships in local non-profits working on environment and social justice challenges. This funding adds to the total amount available for projects. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Carson Scholars Program cultivates and advances interdisciplinary environmental scholarship at the University of Arizona. The program is designed to build a network of graduate students and faculty devoted to furthering knowledge and awareness of Earth’s natural environment and its interactions with people. The program also encourages individual initiative, innovation, and communication. Carson-Haury Scholars, through their emphasis on excellence in interdisciplinary environmental scholarship, problem-solving, and communicating science to a broad audience, will become leaders in the advancement of collaborative solutions to environmental challenges among the public, private, NGO, and academic sectors. For more information, please visit carson.arizona.edu.The Haury program is happy to announce the 2017 Cohort of the Carson Scholars, Agnese Nelms Haury Fellows. 

 

 

Carson Scholars, Agnese Nelms Haury Fellows

     

Pradnya Garud

School of Geography and Development 

First Year Ph.D. Student

 

Kathryn Gouglet

Department of English

MFA candidate in Creative Nonfiction Writing

 

Amado Guzmán

Department of History

Ph.D. Student

 

Megan Mills-Novoa

School of Geography and Development

Ph.D. Student

 

Denise Moreno Ramírez

Department of Soil, Water, and Environmental Science

Ph.D. Student

 

Rodolfo Peón

Arid Lands Resource Sciences, Graduate Interdisciplinary Program

Ph.D. Student

 

   2017    

 

Saleh Ahmed

Arid Lands Resource Sciences, Graduate Interdiscplinary Program

Ph.D. Student

 

Schuyler Chew

Department of Soil, Water, and Environmental Science

 

Fiona Gladstone

School of Geography and Development

Ph.D. Student

 

Carly Nichols

School of Gepgraphy and Development

Ph.D. Student

 

Noah Silber-Coats

School of Geography and Development

Ph.D. Student

   2016 

Gloria Jimenez

Thomas Jones

America N.  Lutz Ley
Niki Von Hederman
   2015

 

 

 

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The Oxford-Haury Native American/First Nations Oxford-Haury Scholarship application materials are available at the Linacre College and Oxford University websites. 

The Oxford-Agnese Nelms Haury Scholarship is a one-year, college-based scholarship in a Masters program at Linacre College of Oxford University. Students apply to Oxford, indicate their eligibility for and interest in the Haury Scholarship on their Oxford application (in their personal statement). Departments and Colleges make selections. No separate application paperwork for the scholarship is required of the applicant to the Agnese Nelms Haury Program.

This Native American and First Nations scholarship provides support (tuition fees and living costs) for indigenous students from the United States and Canada to study for a one-year taught Masters degree at Oxford University (www.ox.ac.uk) in the United Kingdom in association with Linacre College (www.linacre.ox.ac.uk). Linacre College is an interdisciplinary and international graduate college. 

The Agnese Nelms Haury Program also provides funds for the student for

  • one flight from US/Canada to London at the start of the program,
  • one flight from London to US/Canada at the end of program, and
  • visa application expenses for the standard visa process.

To learn more about what to expect as a student at Oxford University >>

Deadlines: The deadlines for applications occur in January 2017 for the designated degrees for entry in September 2017. Information on course content, entry expectations and applications can be found at the links below.

For more information:

For more information about what to expect as a student at Oxford University >>

 

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To honor, reward and encourage outstanding faculty at the University of Arizona, these five-year appointments have been awarded to four senior scholars who work on environment, social justice, and/or the Southwest. These awards encourage mentoring and new research in these areas.

For more information about each individual below, click on their name or photograph.

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To recognize and encourage outstanding mid-career faculty at the University of Arizona, these two-year appointments have been awarded to six faculty members in the areas of environment, social justice, southwest peoples and cultures, international cooperation, and human rights.

For more information about each individual below, click on their name or photograph.

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The inaugural Haury Visiting Fellows brought fresh perspectives and deep experience to the University of the Arizona during the spring semester of 2015.

Anne Waple spent four weeks working with the Center for Climate Adaptation Science and Solutions (CCASS), which also provides funding for her visit. Dr. Waple is Vice President and Chief Innovation Officer at Second Nature, a non-profit network which supports over 600 colleges in the development of sustainability and climate goals. Her work at UA centered on working with campus and Tucson communities to increase regional resilience to impacts from climate change. In addition to individual and small meetings, she presented a lecture in April, “Exploring Climate Resilience.” Post-visit collaborations continue and expand.

Political ecology is the study of relationships between political, economic and social factors with environmental issues and changes. Juanita Sundberg researches political ecology using “the insights of feminist geography and the sensibilities of an ethnographer to bear on nature conservation, border security, and militarization.” The daughter of missionaries, she learned about human-land relations - personal knowledge that serves as the foundation of her professional research. Her Haury Visiting Fellow project, Democracy on the Line: The Political Ecology of Legal Suspension in U.S. Southern Boundary Enforcement, examines the legal framework in which the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) can waive all laws in order to build border walls, roads, and other infrastructure. The DHS Secretary has invoked the waiver five times, waiving thirty-six laws in 2008 to build border infrastructure in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California. US lawmakers continue to introduce legislation to make these waivers permanent, including a recent effort by Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Rep. Matt Salmon (R-Ariz.). For more about this work, follow Dr. Sundberg’s blog.

The Agnese Nelms Haury Program in Environment and Social Justice selected additional visiting fellows in spring 2016 and will open the competitive again in fall 2016. 

[This program in not affiliated with the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research's Agnese N. Haury Visiting Scholar & Trainee Fellowship.]

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The Haury Program believes in strong partnerships to support initiatives within the University of Arizona and in the wider community. These partnerships leverage the resources of the University to promote excellence in research, collaboration, education, and programs. The Program encourages innovation in all areas and invests in networks and programs which educate and implement, especially those which give voice to and work on solutions for those populations most vulnerable to environmental and social justice challenges.

Current Initiatives

Climate Change Adaptation Science and Solutions (CCASS) Native Nations Climate Adaptation Program (NNAP)

Haury Program funding helped initiate the Native Nations Climate Adaptation Program program (NNAP) in January 2015. CCASS is forging teams among local and regional tribal, Hispanic, other vulnerable populations, and the University to create effective practices and increase communities’ resilience as the climate warms. The CCASS/NNAP team has met with individuals, tribal representatives, and groups to determine the needs of vulnerable populations and assess how NNAP and CCASS can help them build resiliency to climate change. Forging networks with vulnerable populations, researchers, educators and government representatives, and private industry is building stronger collaborations to better address the needs of vulnerable populations.

Consortium for Arizona – Mexico Arid Environments/Consorcio Arizona-México para Ambientes Áridos CAZMEX

Arizona and Mexico are experiencing rapid growth and pressing social problems, which are exacerbated by climate change. Building on longstanding partnerships between the University of Arizona and Mexican institutions, CAZMEX addresses shared challenges and responses in the border region. With Haury Program funding, CAZMEX pursues three objectives:

  • generate basic scientific knowledge and monitor physical, biological, and social dynamics in the Sonoran Desert and other arid environments,
  • create strategies to improve the quality of life and to sustainably adapt to changes, and
  • strengthen and forge new binational groups and partnerships of scientists to study the binational socio-ecological region.

Annual competitive grants are supported in seven strategic them areas: climate extremes, especially drought; water resource management; ecosystem processes and services; food systems; renewable energy; social and institutional dynamics and governance; and economic development.

Southwest Climate Justice Network  

The southwestern US and northern Mexico is a literal ‘hotspot’ for climate change.  Observed temperatures have already increased across the region by up to 2ºF contributing to increases in drought, wildfires, heat waves and disease. This region has a high incidence of poverty, especially among the relatively large Hispanic and Native American populations. These populations are especially vulnerable to climate stress.

The unequal impacts of climate change on poor, indigenous, female, elderly and Hispanic populations are clear examples of climate injustice in the southwest US and Mexico. Researchers, environmental and humanitarian groups, social welfare and resource management agencies are responding to citizens’ calls for help, policies and solutions.

The Haury initiative in climate justice at the UA Institute of the Environment will lay the foundations to address injustice through a network in collaboration with other centers around the world and other groups working on environment and social justice in the southwest and Mexico. It will bring together faculty, students, and the community in Tucson and the southwest to address questions of climate justice, provide policy briefs for local and regional decision makers, develop guidelines for neighborhoods and planners, increase awareness amongst the public, incorporate climate justice issues into curricula from elementary schools through university, and contribute research and advice to national and international publications and conferences.

Completed Initiatives

Supporting Student Voices – Increasing Diversity in the UN Climate Negotiations

In December 2015, the United Nations (UN) Framework Convention on Climate Change will host its 21st Conference of the Parties in Paris. Nations from around the world will gather to finalize and sign the new climate change agreement that will replace the Kyoto Protocol in 2020. It is important that individuals as well as world leaders participate in these talks to discuss with negotiators the needs, challenges, and perspectives of their communities.

Although efforts occur to include youthful voices, most young attendees come from privileged backgrounds rather than from the marginalized groups of societies. Sierra Club Student Coalition, SustainUS, Energy Action Coalition work to increase diversity of youthful voices in the discussions about climate change.

The Haury Program invests in efforts to increase the diversity of voices for more just and effective policy making. The Program also supports education to broaden knowledge and skills. Supporting five students to attend the two-week conference has potential to increase the voices heard and empower young people to work for a sustainable future.

EdgeMakers

EdgeMakers’ goal is to empower young innovators to change the world. EdgeMakers held a multi-day Sustainability, Innovation and Social Justice program at Biosphere 2 to teach young people from around the world how to start creating innovative solutions to environmental and social problems. EdgeMakers also held a three-day workshop for regional youth in smmer 2016 at Biosphere 2.

Youth can be a part of the global movement for solutions to environmental and social problems. The key is learning how to bring new ideas to life. Youth with interests in business, science, social activism, government, and arts will work together to learn about sustainability, social justice and to develop the capacity to make meaningful change happen.

The Haury Program invests in initiatives such as EdgeMakers because we need powerful new ways to connect with the next generation to develop the capacity to adapt to and overcome environmental challenges, especially as they impact the more marginalized of society.

 
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One of Mrs. Haury's deepest interests and concerns was social justice in the Southwest. The Agnese Nelms Haury Program in Environment and Social Justice is funding publications and seminars about this topic. The Southwest Center will complete two special issues of the Journal of the Southwest hold a seminar series with the Amerid Museum about the border lands. The Southwest Center of the University of Arizona illuminates the character of the greater Southwest through education, research, and publishing. Three Southwest Center initiatives will bring important documentation to academic studies. The Southwest Center will publish two special issues of the Journal of the Southwest.  In the first, Federico Craveri’s diary from the first his four voyages in the 1850s will appear in English for the first time. The second issue will be dedicated to the archeology, cultural anthropology, ethnobotany and ethno-ecology, tree ring research, and geography of place that inspired Agnese Nelms Haury’s longstanding interest in and support of Southwest studies. This issue will provide a history of Mrs. Haury’s involvement in developing Southwest research efforts. Finally, the Haury Program will fund one year of the Southwest Center/Amerind Museum seminar series which focuses on critical issues in contemporary studies of regional anthropology, history and archeology.

Programs focusing on the southwest at the University of Arizona include The Southwest Center and the Arizona State Museum.

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The Agnese Nelms Haury Program in Environment and Social Justice (Haury Program) distributes funds to the University of Arizona faculty, staff and students and community non-profits through its competitive grant making process. The Haury Program funds people and programs to work at the nexus of the environment and social justice to improve the social foundation while finding solutions to living sustainably within environmental boundaries.

In 2014 and 2015 the Program began to fund educational programs and projects at the University of Arizona. These programs include support for students and researchers, and some are multi-year investments.

In Fall 2015 the Program established its competitive grant making process and began open calls for new initiatives including support for partnerships among UA students, researchers and community groups. The Program made its first competitive awards in January 2016. The next call for proposals will be in spring 2017. Competitions for seed grants and visiting fellows are scheduled for each fall and spring, challenge grants for each fall, faculty fellows for each spring

 

Haury Program Competitive Grantmaking Awards 

Name

Lead

Partners

Type

Award Date

Award Amount

Duration

Early developmenet of an inclusive approach for scenario-based resilence planning
Waple, Anne (Second Nature)
CCASS and Institute of the Environment
Visiting Fellow

February 2015

$5,000
4 weeks

Democracy on the Line: the political ecology of legal suspension in the U.S. southern boundary enforcement
Sundberg, Juanita (University of British Columbia)
School of Geography and Development
Visiting Fellow
February 2015
$12,490
12weeks

Yaqui Ancestral Wheat & Foodways Project

Alvarez, Maribel (UA Southwest Center)
Yaqui Traditional Experts
Seed
January 2016
$60,000
2 years

Greening the Food Deserts of Tucson Arizona
Buechler, Stephanie and Tong, Daoqin (UA Geography & Development)
Community Food Bank, Community Gardens
Seed
January 2016
$48,665
2 years

Engaging Indigenous Voices: On Topics of Environmental Health
Lindsey, Marti (SW Environmental Health Sciences Center UA Pharmacy)
Ak-Chin Indian Community, Tohono O'odham Nation, Baboquivari High School, Ha:sañ Preparatory & Leadership School, Pascua Yaqui Tribe, Hiaki High School, Inter-Tribal Council of Arizona (ITCA), UA Native American Science & Engineering Program (NASEP)
Seed
January 2016
$60,000
2 years

Facilitating Community Action to Address Climate Change and Build Resiliency in Southern Metropolitan Tucson
Wolf, Ann Marie (Sonora Environmental Research Institute, Inc.)
Ramirez-Andreotta (UA SWES), Betterton (UA Atmospheric Sciences)
Seed
January 2016
$25,000
1 year

K’é bee da'ahiiniita: strength through the Navajo clan system to respond to the Gold King Mine Spill

Chief, Karletta (UA SWES) and Beamer, Paloma (UA Public Health)
NAU, Dine Tribal College, Dine Citizens Against Ruining our Environment, Navajo Nation, Fort Lewis College
Challenge
July 2016
$600,000
3 years

Green Streets in South Tucson
Gannon, Katie (Tucson Clean & Beautiful, Inc.)
UA Kitchen Garden, City of South Tucson
Seed
July 2016
$36,140
1 year

The Bio/Diversity Project: Fostering Interest and Diversity in Environmental Science through the Lens of Biodiversity
Williams, Jill  (UA Women in Science and Engineering)

Friends of Saguaro National Park, Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum

Seed
July 2016
$98,155
2 years

Sustainable Urban Transitions in the Southwest: Water Infrastructure and Social Justice in the Mexico-U.S. Borderlands
Meehan, Katie (University of Oregon)
UA Community and School Garden Program 
Visiting Fellow
July 2016
$10,000
2 months

Dialogues across Contemporary & Traditional Knowledge – Food & Water in Arid Lands

Galilee-Belfer, Mika (UA Social & Behavioral Sciences)
Forum Speakers
Visiting Fellow
July 2016
$5,000
1 week/ 2 people

Engaging low-income, underserved communities in a neighborhood greenway: A community-university partnership for project design, implementation and evaluation
Gerlak, Andrea (UA Geography & Development)
Living Streets Alliance, Sonoran Institute, Watershed Management Group
Seed
January 2017

 

$79,153

2 years

Engaging Native Boys in Education, Tribal Lifeways, and Land Stewardship: An Exploration
Wyman, Leisy (UA College of Education)
Eric Dhruv (Ironwood Tree Experience), Melodie Lopez (Indigenous Strategies)
Seed
January 2017
$49,309
2 years

 
Karanikola, Vicki (UA College of Engineering)
 
Faculty Fellow
January 2017
$76,000
2 years

 
Wilder, Ben (UA College of Science)
 
Faculty Fellow
January 2017
$76,000
2 years

Their Dogs Came with Them: Environmental Justice, Social Justice and Theater
Grise, Virginia (playwright)
Arts, Environment and Humanities Network (AEHN)
Visiting Fellow
January 2017
$2,500

2 weeks

 

The Haury Program selects up to three finalists for the challenge grant competition each fall. Each finalist team receives $10,000 to prepare a feasibility study. The winner of the competition is selected each spring following public presentations by each finalist team.

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